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How do I keep my brain healthy?

When you work out, your muscles soon show the effects. Pick up some weights and curl your biceps, they get stronger, more defined and better able to do their job. You can see the muscle becoming more defined, and you can feel its strength under your skin.

You can’t see your brain, or feel it inside the protective casing of your skull. But science is showing that there are steps you can take to strengthen your brain too, and help protect it from the damage of ageing or disease.

This part of the Hello Brain website will help guide you through some of the major trends and findings in scientific research about brain health. 

You’ll see that decline in brain function is not an inevitable part of ageing – many people can live into their 80s, 90s and beyond and keep creating and contributing to relationships and society. 

You’ll learn about how the adaptive brain can rise to new challenges and experiences, and why this is a good thing. 

You’ll find out more about the emerging science of building a ‘reserve’ in the brain to protect against the symptoms of dementia.

Plus you will be able to swot up on lots of practical activity, attitude and lifestyle tips for keeping your brain flexed and ready for life no matter what your age. 

Ready? Scroll down to get started.

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